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Real estate wholesaling occurs when a party (the “wholeseller”) contracts with a home seller, markets the home to potential buyers, and then assigns the contract to one of them. The wholesaler makes a profit, which is the difference between the contracted price with the seller and the amount paid by the buyer. The goal in real estate wholesaling is to sell the home before the contract with the original homeowner closes.

A typical wholesaling scenario looks like this: The wholesaler has a house under contract for $90,000 that he estimates needs $20,000 in repairs but will sell for $150,000 once the repairs are made. Using his network of investors, he finds an eager buyer at $100,000. He assigns the contract to this investor, who then has a profitable fixer-upper project. The wholesaler makes a $10,000 profit without ever owning the home.
 

The key to wholesaling is to add a contingency to the purchase contract that allows the wholesaler to back out of the deal if he is unable to find a buyer before the expected closing date. This limits the wholesaler’s risk.

It is similar to flipping, except that the time frame is much shorter and no repairs are made to the home. As the wholesaler never actually purchases a home, real estate wholesaling is much less risky than flipping, which can involve renovation costs and carrying costs. Real estate wholesaling also involves much less capitalthan flipping. Generally earnest money payments on a few properties is sufficient. Success depends on the wholesaler’s knowledge of the market and connection to investors for quick sales.

The Ultimate Beginner’s Guide to Real Estate Wholesaling

by  | BiggerPockets.com

Real estate wholesaling is one of the most popular strategies for new investors to get involved with because it can be done with limited funds and experience.

But it’s definitely not all it’s cracked up to be.

I recently realized that BiggerPockets did not have one ultimate source of information about wholesaling. So… I thought I’d take up the banner and give myself a place to send people when they ask about wholesaling. It is my hope that this ultimate guide will give you a great starting point for understanding how wholesaling works. Consider this a foundation upon which you can build your wholesaling business.

I’ve made an attempt to be as thorough as possible while still maintaining some brevity, so to aid in that goal I’ve included multiple links to other great BiggerPockets content that I don’t need to repeat. I encourage you to open each and every one of these links into a new tab on your browser and read them all.

Yes, it might take a few hours.

But if you are serious about building serious income from wholesaling, it might be the best investment you’ll ever make.

Finally, understand that no matter how long I make this post, I could never cover everything there is to know about wholesaling. There are too many “but.. what about” and “but… what if”s. Instead, I want to encourage you to ask your questions either in the comments below this post or in the Wholesaling Forumhere on BiggerPockets. The Forums are an incredible place to ask your question and get answers from dozens of successful investors. And it doesn’t cost a thing.

With that, let’s get to the Ultimate Guide to Wholesaling.

wholesaling_ultimate_guide

How to Analyze a Real Estate Deal

Deal analysis is one of the best ways to learn real estate investing and it comes down to fundamental comfort in estimating expenses, rents, and cash flow. This guide will give you the knowledge you need to begin analyzing properties with confidence.

Click Here For Your Free eBook

What is Real Estate Wholesaling?

Wholesaling is a term used in the real estate industry to describe the process of finding great real estate deals and getting paid to bring them to real estate investors. It’s similar to a “finder’s fee,” but with some added paperwork thrown in to make it more legal and acceptable.

Wholesaling can seem a little confusing, so I find it best to illustrate the concept with an example of how it’s done.

Jim is a wholesaler. He actively markets for incredible real estate deals, but doesn’t actually want to buy them. On a cold January morning, Jim gets a phone call from Deborah. Deborah wants to sell her home, but doesn’t want to use a real estate agent. She tells him that the house is in bad shape, and she just wants to get out before she lets it go back to the bank in a foreclosure.

Jim meets with Deborah at the home and offers her $50,000 for the property. Deborah agrees to the price and they sign a contract – a purchase and sale document. This document states that Jim (or someone else he sells the contract to) will buy the home for $50,000 within the next 21 days.  

Jim then goes and talks with his friend Tom, an active house flipper. He shows all the numbers to Tom, and Tom decides that this property would be a good flip. Tom agrees to pay $55,000 for the property and knows he can make a good profit at that price.

Jim and Tom then sign an “assignment contract” where Jim gives Tom the right to buy the home from Deborah (because remember, the contract between Jim and Deborah said that either Jim or someone else will buy the home. This is known as an assignment, and we’ll go into more detail in a bit on this).

Jim gives all the paperwork over to the local Title company to process. In the end, Deborah gets her $50,000 price she asked for. Tom (the flipper) pays $55,000 for the house. And Jim, the wholesaler, keeps the $5,000 difference as his wholesale fee.

Jim never owned the property, but made $5,000 for bringing together Tom and Deborah.

Keep in mind, this is just one common way that wholesale deals are put together, and there are many other possible ways to structure a deal.

Related: Is Wholesaling the Best Way to Get Started in Real Estate? An Investor’s Analysis

Now that you have a basic understanding of what wholesaling is, let’s move on and talk about one of the most common questions people have: can I wholesale without a lot of money?

Real Estate Wholesaling Illegal

Is Wholesaling Illegal?

[Editor’s Note: Please be aware that this material does not serve as legal advice. To safely practice wholesaling, be sure to consult Federal and State laws specific to your area before executing any deals.]

One of the more “hotly debated” topics on BiggerPockets is concerning the legality of wholesaling. In fact, one of the most popular threads on the BiggerPockets Forums right now talks about how wholesalers in Ohio are getting fined by the State for their “illegal practices.”

Scary stuff for any wholesaler!

I am not a lawyer, and laws like this are very state-specific, but allow me to share my opinion on the subject. As with any business transaction, you should consult an attorney before engaging in any kind of real estate activity.

What’s Illegal About Wholesaling?

The essence of the debate on whether wholesaling is illegal revolves around the term “brokering.”

Although each state has its own definition, a broker is someone who helps put a deal together.

Related: The Ultimate Beginner’s Guide to Real Estate Wholesaling

Here is how the state of Florida defines a broker:

“‘Broker’ means a person who, for another, and for a compensation or valuable consideration directly or indirectly paid or promised, expressly or impliedly, or with an intent to collect or receive a compensation or valuable consideration therefore, appraises, auctions, sells, exchanges, buys, rents, or offers, attempts or agrees to appraise, auction, or negotiate the sale, exchange, purchase, or rental of business enterprises or business opportunities or any real property or any interest in or concerning the same.” (source)

Here in Washington State (where I live), brokering is defined as the

listing, selling, purchasing, exchanging, optioning, leasing, renting of real estate,or any real property interest therein…” and “Negotiating or offering to negotiate, either directly or indirectly, the purchase, sale, exchange, lease, or rental of real estate, or any real property interest therein.” (source)

Those who argue that real estate wholesaling is illegal claim it to be illegal because the wholesaler is acting as a “broker” in the deal without being licensed.

Those who defend wholesaling without a license say that wholesaling is not brokering, but simply signing a contract and then assigning that contract to another,and therefore the law does apply to this situation. They are not selling a property, but simply selling the ownership of a real estate contract. (Check out this video on YouTube for more on that position.)

To further complicate the situation, there is the issue of “marketing” a property that you do not currently own. Most states also include “marketing a property” as brokering. For example, if Jim the wholesaler, who buys a property from Deborah and then sells it to Tom. Had Jim put the ad for the house on Craigslist or elsewhere, is he marketing the property? Most definitely! But what if he wasn’tmarketing the property? What exactly defines marketing? If Jim knew the cash buyer Tom and told him about the deal, is that marketing?

If you were to ask ten different lawyers, you might get ten different answers.

However, I do believe the way many wholesalers work could be considered illegal.

Putting a deal under contract, marketing the deal all over Craigslist, and then assigning that deal is a fast way to get fined by your state government and get a nice misdemeanor on your record! 

As Dave J. asked in the forum conversation about Ohio wholesaling, “What is your intent and how comfortable are you if you have to defend that position if you find the local real estate commission asking questions?” 

The Right Way to Wholesale?

Therefore, how does one protect oneself from breaking the law? Here are a few tips that I believe (again, this is my opinion. You should talk to an attorney.)

1.) Get Your License: Simple. No one can accuse you of brokering without a license if you have a your license. Yes, this might cost you a couple grand, but it’s better than getting a penalty from the state for breaking the law!

or

2.) Buy the Property and Then Sell the Property: We’ll talk more about this process later in this post, but rather than “assigning” the contract, simply buy the property and then re-sell it (even if you only own it for 5 minutes, through a “double close”). Again, we’ll talk about this later.

The truth about wholesaling is this: Whether or not wholesaling is illegal in your state, it definitely flirts with a line.

If you want to see how close to that line you can get, fine. That is your choice.

However, if you want to be sure that you are operating your wholesaling business as pure and solid as possible, get your license or physically close on the property, take title, and then sell it after. 

wholesaling_get_started_real_estate

Can I Wholesale With No Money Down?

Yes… and no.

As you saw in the example above, it is possible to wholesale without money. However, the one thing I glossed over in the story above is how Jim got the phone call from Deborah.

I’ll tell you this: he didn’t get it by sitting around in his undies playing Call of Duty.

Wholesaling is a marketing game, and the best wholesalers are the best marketers. And marketing is rarely free (though there are ways).

Instead, Jim likely spent a significant amount of time and money to get this phone call. We’ll talk more about that in just a moment, but understand this: wholesaling can be done without money, but not without effort.

If you are interested in learning more about the various no money down strategies involved with wholesaling, flipping, or landlording, I hope you’ll pick up a copy of The Book on Investing in Real Estate with No (and Low) Money Down here on BiggerPockets. (I wrote it, and there is an entire chapter dedicated to wholesaling. It’s like this post you are reading… on crack.) But anyway, let’s move on.

The rest of this post is dedicated to showing you the effort it might take to become a great wholesaler. But first, let’s talk about my beef with wholesaling.

house hack

My Problem With Wholesaling

Everyone loves wholesaling.

And what’s not to love? It sounds just so stinkin’ easy. Just find a good deal and find a cash buyer and … boom. Done.

So why don’t I recommend most people start with wholesaling?

Here’s the truth: wholesaling is one of the most difficult avenues to make money with real estate.

Now, that’s something you don’t hear the gurus say often. In fact, most of the real estate gurus and trainers encourage people to start with wholesaling because it’s so easy, and it can be done with no money down!

But here’s my beef: most wholesalers fail because it’s hard.

To be good at wholesaling, you need to be good at:

  • Knowing the math behind a good flip
  • Knowing the math behind a good rental
  • Talking with motivated people in distressed situations
  • Negotiating without taking advantage of people
  • Marketing for leads that cost less than the marketing does
  • Answering the phone
  • Sales
  • Finding good deals
  • Estimating the after repair value
  • Estimating rehab costs
  • Estimating potential rents

See what I’m getting at? Sure, you can outsource some of this stuff, but as the business owner, you still need to be the one in charge and you need to know how all this works.

In other words: To be a good wholesaler, you need to be good at a lot of stuff.

Furthermore, you are competing with other investors who don’t need to make that wholesale fee and therefore can pay more than you. For example, in the story above, Tom ended up paying $55,000 for the property, so he could have simply found Deborah first, and if Jim and Tom ended up competing, Tom could pay $55,000, but Jim would need to pay $50,000. Who do you think Deborah is going to go with? Tom, of course!

A wholesaler needs to find great deals and thus needs to work harder to find those deals. And if you want to get what no one else will get, you have to be willing to do what no one else will do: Hustle.

I don’t say this stuff to discourage you — only to dispel any belief that this wholesaling game is “easy” and “quick.” It’s a job, a business. It’s work.

However, for those willing to put in the work, great things can happen. The story above with Jim and Tom is fairly simple, but a $5,000 wholesale fee is completely normal for good wholesalers.

And good wholesalers don’t do just one deal… they do a lot, and a lot of money can be made.

high sights

Finding Great Deals

A wholesaler without a good deal is like a butcher without any meat. It’s useless. Therefore, a wholesaler must become proficient and effective at building a pipeline of great real estate deals.

I say “pipeline” because your goal as a wholesaler is likely not to do just one deal and be done. Your goal is probably to do a lot of deals.

However, deals must be “massaged” into fruition and can take quite a bit of time.

Therefore, successful wholesalers consistently are filling up their pipeline with leads and working those leads through the pipeline. This pipeline consists of finding the leads, taking the phone call, building trust with the seller, doing due diligence, doing the math, preparing inspections or bids, and getting the deal signed at closing. At any given point, you might have 20 different deals in your pipeline in different phases of the deal, and it’s your job to consistently move them all forward toward profitability.

Let’s talk about how to get deals into this pipeline to begin with. First, understand that there are many ways to find good deals. I’ll outline just a few of the most common methods below, but creativity is key when finding good deals. Hopefully these methods below (and corresponding links) will give you a good place to start.

(For more on finding great real estate deals, check out my book How to Find Incredible Real Estate Deals — yours free when you buy The Book on Investing in Real Estate with No (and Low) Money Down – Ultimate Package.)

1.) The MLS

The MLS is the collection of all deals currently being sold by real estate agents. Although it can be difficult to find deals because of the competition, it is possible. Keep in mind, it can be difficult to wholesale a bank foreclosed home, but not impossible. The best part about wholesaling an MLS deal is the ability to still use a real estate agent to make it happen. For more on buying on the MLS, see “Five Tips to Get Great Deals On the MLS (Including Buying Houses on Friday…?).”

Related: I Used to Write Off Wholesaling: Here’s What Changed My Mind

2.) Driving for Dollars

Driving for Dollars is the practice of getting in your car and driving around looking for potential deals. Typically, your goal is to look for properties that are “distressed.” This could be indicated by long grass, boarded up windows, tarps on the roof, legal notices on the windows, or anything else that makes the home appear to be someone’s problem. For more on Driving for Dollars, see “Driving for Dollars Bible: Finding Distressed Properties and Marketing.”

3.) Direct Mail

Direct Mail is the art and science of sending out targeted pieces of mail to potential motivated sellers. You can purchase lists of potential leads from companies like ListSource.com or MellisaData.com for pennies per name and send the postcards, yellow letters, typed letters, and more. Your goal with direct mail is to get a certain percentage of people to call you and to get a certain percentage of those to sell you their home.

For example, you might send 1,000 pieces of mail, get 3.3{8f94767b108f959e383bda5a290f0d5b63419dcf7b88344684a7be35dce9d28b} of those people to call you (30 phone calls) and get 3.3{8f94767b108f959e383bda5a290f0d5b63419dcf7b88344684a7be35dce9d28b} of those to sell you their home, resulting in one sale. It might cost you $1,000 to send those letters, but if you can make $5k, $10k, or $20k on that investment, it might be a great use of funds. For a much more thorough post on Direct Mail marketing, see “The Ultimate Guide to Using Direct Mail Advertising to Grow Your Real Estate Business.”

4.) Other

There are a lot of other methods to find good deals that I don’t have time to cover. Things like Craigslist, billboards, online marketing, SEO, networking, co-wholesaling, and more. If you want to learn more about these, just search BiggerPockets, and you’ll likely find numerous articles on each topic.

At this point, you should be able to start finding deals. But wait… how do you know if it’s a good deal or not?

This is when Math comes in really handy. So lets talk about that.

cashflow_over_equity

Wholesaling Math

Yes, math is not everyone’s favorite subject, but the simple truth is this: Learn the math or don’t wholesale. There is no other way.

On a positive note, the math is not tough. In fact, once you figure it out, it’s fairly easy. Even better, there are online calculators that can help you tremendously in this area, and I’ll show you my favorite one in just a moment. But first, let’s cover the basics.

How Much Should You Offer?

Wholesalers find deals for other people. Therefore, it makes sense that the only way to find out what to pay is to start at the end and work backwards. After all, if you want to sell a property to a flipper, that flipper is going to need to make money or they won’t buy it from you in the first place.

The price you end up paying is known as the Maximum Allowable Offer (MAO). It’s the most amount of money you can afford to offer a seller and still make the kind of profit you want.

To come up with the MAO we need to start with the ARV, or After Repair Value. The ARV is the final price that the house flipper is going to sell the property for, someday.

From that number we need to subtract out all the costs associated with the deal. These costs are:

  • The Flipper’s Profit (how much the flipper wants to make on the flip)
  • Repair Costs (how much it costs to fix up)
  • Fixed Costs (how much the deal is going to cost the flipper, including holding costs and transaction costs on both sides of the deal)
  • The Wholesale Profit (how much the wholesaler wants to make)

For those who would rather see a formula, it looks like this:

MAO = [ARV] – [Flipper’s Profit] – [Repair Costs] – [Fixed Costs] – [Wholesale Fee]

Let’s use the example from the beginning of this post, with Jim, Tom, and Deborah.

Jim did his homework and knew that the After Repair Value of this property would be around $110,000. He knew that Tom always planned to make $20,000 as a profit on any flip. He also knew that the fixed costs on a flip would be about $15,000 (including the holding costs, the Realtor fees when Tom sold it, and the closing costs at the beginning and end). Next, Jim knew the home needed about $30,000 of labor and material to fix up. Finally, Jim knew he wanted to make $5,000 on the deal.

Therefore:

MAO = $110,000 – $20,000 – $30,000 – 15,000 – $5,000.

MAO = $40,000.

This is how Jim determined that $40,000 was the right price to pay.

But How Do I Learn All These Numbers?

Most people understand the math up until this point. However, the mistakes are made when a wholesaler dives deeper into the math. After all, how did Jim know that the fixed costs would be $15,000? How did he know the repairs would add up to $30,000?

If you are experienced, you can sit down and pencil out all these numbers. But if you are new to this and don’t plan on spending tens of thousands of dollars for personal coaching, I want to introduce you to the Wholesaling Calculator from BiggerPockets.

The Wholesaling Calculator allows you to go in and determine your Maximum Allowable Offer for your next potential wholesale deal. You’ll simply walk step by step through the questions and you’ll be able to make better, faster, more confident decisions.

Let me show you a quick video of how this calculator works. I’ll use the example from this post.

As you can see, all those confusing numbers become a lot more manageable when you walk through the process step by step. The Wholesaling Calculator can even help you determine the repair costs by walking step by step through the various components of the house that need to be repaired!

Another great thing about the Wholesaling Calculator: You can choose whether or not you are planning to sell to a house flipper or a landlord AND print out PDF reports specifically designed to sell your deal to those cash buyers. These reports were designed to show the cash buyer exactly what they need to see to make a decision — and make you look incredibly organized in the process. 

The wholesaling calculator was designed by investors, for investors, and contains all the information needed to make a great deal. As a free BiggerPockets user, you can go in and test the calculator three times. After that, you need to upgrade to a BiggerPockets Pro Membership in order to use it.

To upgrade to BiggerPockets Pro, click here or visit BiggerPockets.com/pro

Determining ARV

One thing the calculator can not do for you is to determine the ARV, which is the most important number in the entire math process. Every single number is subtracted from this figure, so it must be accurate to continue.

So how do you determine the ARV?

There are several methods but they generally revolve around one simple principle: Houses are worth about what local similar houses have recently sold for.

If a home sold 20 miles away, it’s likely not close enough. If a home sold with four bedrooms and your potential deal has 2 bedrooms, it’s likely not similar enough. If a home sold in terrible condition, it’s likely not similar enough because you are looking for the “after repair value” — in other words, the home in good condition.

Although it’s unlikely to find a recently sold home that is identical, to estimate the ARV you need to get as close as possible and make slight corrections. Two bathrooms versus one? Compensate for it in your numbers (an extra bathroom is sure to add some value, right?). If your property has 2,000 square feet and the recent sold one has 1,500, compensate for that (because more square footage should be worth more, right?).

An Easier Way to Find ARV

Perhaps the best way to find the ARV of a potential deal is to ask a local real estate agent. They have access to a tremendous amount of data of recently sold homes and can help you quite a bit until you get the hang of it. However, many agents will not want to do this work for you for free, so you’ll need to find a way to make it worth it for them. (Not that it’s a lot of work, but it does require a few minutes of their time.) 

I recommend building solid relationships with a few agents so you can give them your “unworkable leads,” and they can potentially make money by selling those leads. For example, if you can’t help a homeowner by wholesaling their home, perhaps the agent can sell it on the open real estate market instead.

This can be a true win-win relationship with an agent. 

business deal

Making Your Offer 

Once you’ve determined your MAO, it’s time to make that offer. This is when your skills at negotiating come in really handy.

I could tell you all about negotiating a deal with a seller, but it would pale in comparison to the information you’ll get from Michael Quarles on the 77th episode of the BiggerPockets Podcast.

If you want to take your wholesaling business seriously and want to do more deals this year, take an hour and listen to this. 

Related: 7 Intuitive Tech Tools to Streamline Your Wholesaling Business

After negotiating the deal and coming to terms on a price, it’s time to sign the contract. In some states you can pick up a standard state-approved purchase and sale document. In other states you can pick up one from a local Title company, buy one at Staples or OfficeMax, or purchase one online from a site like EZLandlordForms.com. You might even find one in the BiggerPockets FilePlace.

There are several ways to actually close on the sale of the home, and the way you write your contract is going to depend on which way you plan on closing (assignment vs. double closing). 

In an assignment, you will simply write (in the spot where you write the buyer’s name) “and/or assigns” after your name. This means that you, and/or someone you assign the contract to, will buy the property. Assignments are typically not allowed when buying foreclosures, but most homeowners will not care. However, it’s important that you are upfront with the seller about your intentions. Next, you’ll need to sign an “assignment contract” with your cash buyer which officially assigns them the contract. 

For a double closing, you can simple sign the document in your name or business name. A double closing is the process of actually buying the property and then immediately reselling the property in the same day — within minutes of each other. If you don’t have the full 100{8f94767b108f959e383bda5a290f0d5b63419dcf7b88344684a7be35dce9d28b} cash for the deal, there are numerous transactional lenders who can fund the deal for you for a 24 hour period — and a fee.

Now you have your contract. It’s time to get it sold!

need_capital_real_estate_investing

Cash Buyers

Sure, you could take that good deal and go buy it for yourself. Maybe you’ll make a bunch of money if you flipped it. However, you are wholesaling this deal, not flipping it, so your goal is to get rid of the property as quick as possible so you can focus on finding other deals.

 So… who are you going to sell it to?

Likely, you’ve heard the term “cash buyer” before. It’s a bit of a buzzword that a lot of gurus like to toss around, but it is a real thing.

A cash buyer is a buyer who can pay cash for a house. Duh. However, it doesn’t necessarily mean it needs to be their cash; oftentimes a cash buyer can use private money or hard money to put the deal together. The point is: The cash buyer doesn’t need to go through a lengthy loan process that might be declined. They can purchase the property from you, guaranteed.

Cash buyers are typically house flippers, but they might also be local rental property investors as well. Everyone is looking for a good deal these days, and a lot of people have the cash to make it happen if you can find them the deal.

There is a lot of hype about finding cash buyers and building your cash buyer’s list. You can spend thousands of dollars for online programs designed to help you get thousands of cash buyers. However… let me save you some cash.

The truth is: Cash buyers are easy to find. If you’ve done everything else right, cash buyers are everywhere.

The best cash buyers are individuals who have bought similar properties for cash recently in the same area. But how do you find them?

You could put a free ad up on Craigslist or pay for an ad in the newspaper, but another great way is by asking a real estate agent to give you a list of all homes within a 20 mile radius that were “cash sales.” This data is easy and quick for them to get to you. Then, simply do some public record searching to see who bought those homes and send a letter or give them a call. 

Again, cash buyers are looking for deals. If you can show them that you are a serious wholesaler who will make them money, it’s the world’s easiest sell.

Don’t fall for the hype that you need to build a cash buyer’s list. This is just a distraction from your actual job: find a great deal.

Additionally, you don’t need hundreds of cash buyers. You don’t need dozens. You need a small handful, maybe just one.

Yep, I said it. Just one.

If you are just getting started wholesaling, one of the best strategies is to find one great cash buyer, have them tell you what they are looking for, and find them a deal.

real_estate_wholesaling

Getting Paid

At this point you’ve done your homework, marketed for properties, got a property under contract, assigned it to the cash buyer, and… now what?

Related: The 5 Areas Where Newbies Trip and Fall in Wholesaling

It’s time to get paid?

This part of the process is actually pretty easy because there is not much for you to do. You simply need to get the title company all the information (the original purchase and sale agreement, the assignment contract, etc.) and sit back and let them do their magic. (If you are in a state that uses attorneys instead of Title Companies, then get it all to your closing attorney.)

The title company should take care of the rest if they know what they are doing. I’d recommend working with a title company familiar with wholesaling, as many are not. If you are unsure of what the best title company is to use, try asking some local wholesalers in your area or simply pick up the phone and start calling wholesalers.

In the end, the seller is going to get the money they were promised. The cash buyer is going to get a great deal. And you are going to be a little richer.

Now, what are you going to do with that money?

Buy a new car?

Get a new wardrobe?

Probably. BUT if you are wise, you will look at this money as an investment and will recycle it back into your marketing budget to keep your pipeline full. Doing one deal isn’t going to change your life, but creating a wholesaling pipeline that consistently brings in great deals will.

If you’ve enjoyed this guide, I hope you’ll do me the honor of sharing this on your Facebook wall. You never know whose life you just might change (and your family and friends might finally get it!).

Key Takeaways
 
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